Join the Front

What is Human Trafficking?

Human trafficking is an industry that profits from the sale of human beings.
Victims of human trafficking are held against their will. They are forced to work or provide services to the trafficker or others.  It is happening all over our world, right now.

The work or services may include anything from forced labor to commercialized sexual exploitation.
There may be a work contract with no or low payment. Sometimes the arrangement is based on debt bondage with the victim unable to pay off the debt.

Trafficking victims live a life marked by abuse.
Their basic human rights are ignored their trafficker. Victims are kept in slavery through fear, abuse, and intimidation.

Traffickers frequently recruit people through fraudulent advertisements.
They may promise legitimate jobs as hostesses, house cleaners, or agricultural workers. Trafficking victims of all kinds come from rural, suburban, and urban areas.

Trafficking is a lucrative industry.
It is the fastest growing criminal industry in the world and the second largest criminal activity. The total annual revenue for trafficking in persons is estimated to be between $5 billion and $9 billion.

Human trafficking differs from people smuggling.
In people smuggling, a person voluntarily requests or hires an individual, known as a smuggler, to covertly transport them from one location to another. While smuggling requires travel, trafficking does not. Human trafficking means the illegal trade of human beings. It does not mean the person has been transported from one place to another.

Understanding the problem is just the beginning. Now that you know what it looks like, start making a difference.

Human trafficking differs from people smuggling

In smuggling, people voluntarily request or hire an individual, known as a smuggler, to covertly transport them from one location to another. This generally involves transportation from one country to another, where legal entry would be denied upon arrival at the international border. There may be no deception involved in the (illegal) agreement.  After entry into the country and arrival at their ultimate destination, the smuggled person is usually free to find their own way.

While smuggling requires travel, trafficking does not. Much of the confusion rests with the term itself. The word “trafficking” includes the word “traffic,” which means transportation or travel. However, while the words look and sound alike, they do not hold the same meaning.